I am a philosopher of science and mind. I am an Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department at Tulane University, a faculty member in the Tulane Brain Institute, and the director of the Tulane Cognitive Studies Program. I am also a guest editor for the Brains Blog.

Until recently, I was the book review editor at Philosophical Psychology. I have resigned any affiliation with the journal over the publication of the recent piece by Cofnas. The paper exhibits significant failures of empirical and philosophical reasoning, in addition to its morally objectionable position, and it should never have been published. I was not consulted on the decision to publish it and have severed all ties with the journal.

My research focuses on a wide range of topics, most of which stem from an interest in how to functionally decompose complex cognitive and biological systems. I am also interested in how scientists reason-what their concepts are like, how they employ representations of different kinds, and how these representations relate to explanation and scientific practice. My science interests include systems neuroscience, cognitive science, perceptual psychology, and molecular biology. You can follow my work on Academia.edu and ResearchGate, or email me (dburnsto@tulane.edu) about anything at all.

Recent and Forthcoming Talks

  • 'Complex Mapping Tools and Task Ontologies' NeuroTech, Pittsburgh Center for Philosophy of Science, January 2020.
  • 'Embodied Agency and Pluralistic Folk Psychology', New Orleans Workshop on Agency and Responsibility, New Orleans, November 2019.
  • 'Neural Decoding and Neural Representation', Deep South Philosophy of Neuroscience Workshop, Pensacola, September 2019.
  • 'Embodied Agency and Pluralistic Folk Psychology', New Orleans Workshop on Agency and Responsibility, New Orleans, November 2019.
  • 'A Plea for Task Ontology,' Natural Kinds in Cognitive Science Workshop, York University, June 2019.
  • 'Multimodality and Defining the Senses,' AISC Midterm Conference, Symposium on Multimodality, Lucca, May 2019.
  • 'The Neuroscience of Decision as a Basis for Social Neuroscience,' AISC Midterm Conference, Lucca, May 2019.
  • 'Tools, Skills, and the Organization of the Mind,' Re-Tuning Cognition with a Box of Rocks Workshop, University of Pittsburgh, March 2019.
  • 'Causal and Semantic Relations between Cognitive and Sensorimotor States,' University of Pittsburgh, January 2019.
  • 'Inferentialism and Maker's Knowledge,' Modeling and Reasoning in the Sciences Workshop, National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan, December 2019.